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A list of all the posts and pages found on the site. For you robots out there is an XML version available for digesting as well.

Pages

Posts

Test post

Published:

Quick test post. Need to incorporate the dates into the teaching and talks pages, I think.

portfolio

Boamc Thuiyz Jungx Muishaung dictionary

Collaborative dictionary project with Mr. Wanglung Kelim Mossang of Arunachal Pradesh for the Muishaung language, a Tibeto-Burman variety spoken on the India/Myanmar border. 2015 – present. Development of tools to collaborate remotely in the creation and management of a database and a corresponding mobile phone app for community use. Click title for more info.

Ichō dictionary development software

Development of desktop and mobile applications for collaborative collection and management of community-driven dictionaries for under-documented languages.

Tai Phake dictionary

Assistance in development of the Tai Phake dictionary of around 20,000 words with Mr. Ailot Hailowng currently of Dibrugarh, Assam, India. 2015 – present. Mobile phone edition release planned for December 2019.

乡音苑 Phonemica

Creator, co-founder with Steve Hansen, primary developer. 2011 - present. Online platform for crowd-sourced dialect and oral history preservation, focused primarily on minority languages in and around China.

Singpho mobile phone dictionary

Developed in collaboration with the Singpho Language & Cultural Development Society based on initial data collection by Ven. Pannasara Thera.

Tangsa-Nocte linguistic database

Development of a collaborative database intended to store the collected knowledge of Tangsa-Nocte language varieties by documentary researchers. 2018 – present. Funded through La Trobe University by a grant received by Dr. Stephen Morey and Dr. Jürgen Schöpf.

publications

Written Standardization as a Precursor to Diglossia: A Case Study of Wu

Published in LACUS Forum vol. XXXVI, Linguistic Association of Canada & the United States, 2010

This paper introduces the lack of a written standard for the Wu dialects as the primary limiting factor in creating a standardised form of the language. Examples are given of past attempts starting with missionary efforts in the late 1800s all the way up to modern re-appropriations of existing graphemes.

An Answer to Y.R. Chao’s Problem of Affricate Distributions in Wú

Published in LACUS Forum vol. XXXXI, Linguistic Association of Canada & the United States, 2015

This paper provides a solution to an apparent lack of discernable pattern for voiced fricative and affricate onsets within a specific class of words. It shows the current distribution to be the result of two competing sound shifts between affrication on the one hand and deaffrication on the other, providing a model for the lexical diffusion of the feature based in an historical context of human migration starting from the fall of the Northern Song.

A cross-varietal description of modifiers of basic colour terms in Tangsa-Nocte

Published in North East Indian Linguistics 8, 2018

This paper introduces the lack of a written standard for the Wu dialects as the primary limiting factor in creating a standardised form of the language. Examples are given of past attempts starting with missionary efforts in the late 1800s all the way up to modern re-appropriations of existing graphemes.

Recommended citation: van Dam, Kellen Parker. 2018. A cross-varietal description of modifiers of basic colour terms in Tangsa-Nocte. North East Indian Linguistics (NEIL) 8, 47-64. Canberra, Australian National University: Asia-Pacific Linguistics Open Access. ISBN: 978-1-922185-41-9.

Mapping the Frontier: Correlating Representations of Tangsa-Nocte Villages in Early British Survey Maps with Modern GIS Data

Published in Anthropology Today: An International Peer Reviewed Neira Journal, 2019

“The article titled “Mapping the frontier: Correlating representations of Tangsa-Nocte villages in early British survey maps with modern GIS data” by Kellen Parker van Dam, is an attempt to study the old British records on the inhabitants in the Upper Patkai region who are categorized as Naga but are known in Arunachal Pradesh by different names like Tangsa, Nocte etc. The researcher’s purpose is to revisit the old mapping with the modern GIS data system so as to provide a more credible picture while at the same time reassert the identity, history and place of these communities.”

The Syntax of Intensifiers in Muishaung

Published in Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area, 43.1, 2020

The Tangsa-Nocte languages of the India/Myanmar border region employ a system of suffixes to modify descriptive words. These may be reduplicated under certain conditions, determined by the stress patterns of the larger utterance. Previously referred to as intensifiers (Morey, n.d.; van Dam 2018), these affixes modify their stems to cover a wide range of different meanings, with each stem having a limited and sometimes unique set of applicable modifiers. Such intensifiers are found throughout the Pangwa varieties of Tangsa-Nocte and occur with the majority of basic adjectives derived from monosyllabic verbal stems.

(in preparation) A diagnostic featural list for classification of varieties within Tangsa-Nocte

Published in North East Indian Linguistics Society 11, 2021

This paper presents a diagnostic check-list of features identified as representative of the branches of Tangsa-Nocte which may be used to better classify varieties within the larger Tangsa-Nocte group. The purpose for such classification is to assist in ongoing efforts by scholars of Tangsa-Nocte varieties to better understand the historical development of Tangsa-Nocte and its classification as a whole within Sal and Tibeto-Burman.

talks

The Future of the Shanghai Dialects

Published:

吴语对大多说上海人来说占据了他们每日与家人, 朋友交流的很大一部分. 方言的未来怎样? 是否有保存的价值? 就保护方言来说,现在做了什么?

teaching

LIN2MK, LIN3SEM Making Meaning & Semantics

undergraduate tutorial, La Trobe University, Languages & Linguistics, 2018

Semantics and meaning tutorial as part of the LIN2MK (2nd year) & LIN3SEM (3rd year) undergraduate major at La Trobe University. Lecturer: Dr. Stephen Morey.